Balitriptips.com

Rent a car with driver speaking English
(Private Car Charter)

 

Explore this magnificent island “as you please” with your own private car and your own driver. Stop where you like and for as long as you like.

 

 

 

TYPE OF VEHICLE  TOYOTA AVANZA

CAPACITY -------: 5 persons
PRICE-------------: Rp. 450.000 /car/10hours
INCLUDING ------: Petrol, tax, parking fee, experienced driver and -----------------------map of Bali

 

 

 

TYPE OF VEHICLE  SUZUKI APV

CAPACITY -------: 5 persons
PRICE-------------: Rp. 450.000 /car/10hours
INCLUDING ------: Petrol, tax, parking fee, experienced driver and -----------------------map of Bali

 

 

TYPE OF VEHICLE TOYOTA INOVA

CAPACITY -------: 5 persons
PRICE-------------: Rp. 550.000 /car/10hours
INCLUDING ------: Petrol, tax, parking fee, experienced driver and -----------------------map of Bali

 

 

TYPE OF VEHICLE  ISUZU ELF MINI BUS

CAPACITY -------: 12 persons
PRICE-------------: Rp. 650.000 /car/10hours
INCLUDING ------: Petrol, tax, parking fee, experienced driver and -----------------------map of Bali

 

 

TYPE OF VEHICLE  BUS

CAPACITY -------: 25 persons
PRICE-------------: Rp. 1.200.000 /bus/10hours
INCLUDING ------: Petrol, tax, parking fee, experienced driver and -----------------------map of Bali

 

 

 

 

For more information, please contact us

 

 

 

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While on the road, an important virtue to have here is patience! Although the road system in the heavily populated areas is in reasonable condition compared to other developing countries, it can be heavily congested at peak periods. Ceremonial processions sometimes occupy the whole road so if you are caught behind a procession, enjoy the colorful experience. Roads can also be quite narrow with heavy pedestrian traffic on each side. In less populated areas, roads may not be tarred and the famous “gang’’ (very small road just big enough to accommodate one car, but very often two-way) is ever present no matter what area you may be in. This invariably tests the reversing skills of many drivers!

Take note of several important points while driving in Bali. It is not unusual for cars and bikes to swerve into your lane without indication. A system of “sharing lane” has developed because there are often obstacles on the sides of the road, such as parked cars or the frequent procession of bakso trolleys and paraphernalia salesman.

That’s okay if you’re used to it but can be quite a shock to the new driver in Bali! Be aware that drivers from side streets often don’t look when joining a main road and the larger vehicle is king of the road.

Quite often red traffic lights are considered “only as a suggestion” and there are a few places where traffic in the left lane may turn or continue straight through whilst the light is red with a sign “belok kiri jalan terus”.

Remember to “toot” your horn when going around curves on mountainous roads as drivers commonly drive in the middle of the road here. There are a lot of one way roads in Bali (meant to help traffic flow but it hasn’t really turned out that way). If you miss your turn off, you may have drive quite a distance before being able to turn back. This has resulted in motorbike riders riding a few hundred meters in the wrong direction, as a shortcut rather than following traffic flow. Be alert!

 

It is not recommended to drive at night especially on the road to Gilimanuk where the ferry to Java commences. Truck drivers to and from Java are notorious for overtaking on corners. Only a leafy tree branch often marks obstacles such as potholes or road construction. By the time you think, “What’s that there for?” you could well be in a pothole!

You can fill up at any of the numerous government owned petrol stations or in more remote areas as stalls by the side of the road displaying bottled of clear liquid. The quality may not be as good as at the petrol station. Please fill up your car rental at the government petrol station in the beginning of your daily adventure. Please see the pictures below for your guide:

 

 

 

Our Links

 

Balitriptips.com
Tours and Transport Organizer

 

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Balitemple.com

Journey to the sacred places

 

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Baliinsight. com

When sharing is an experience

 

 

 

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Baliforest.com
Green side of Bali

 

 

 

Balimountain.com
Journey to the highland

 

 

 

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Baleganjur.com
Introduction to Bali Music and Dance

 

 

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Tips for Women Travellers in Bali

Sexual harassment and rape are not too common in Bali, as far as foreigners are concerned. Many foreign women come to Bali looking for a holiday romance. Nothing wrong with that, just saying there is a well worn path, and many Bali beach boys, especially in the Kuta area, are actively trying to get together with foreign women, for the financial benefits. If this does not include you, don’t stress, be polite and say you are married. Many solo women travelers wear a ring, to indicate marriage. Ignore the pettier kinds of behavior (whistling, shouting, etc.), but make a scene if you are ever pressured into doing things against your will, or are being moved from one location to another. If you are raped / attacked, call the Bali Police, (0361) 224111, and contact your consulate.
-Dress code in Bali : Bali in a Hindu island and therefore enjoys relaxed attitudes to things of a sexual nature. Hindu art and Balinese dances, often contain deliberately suggestive material. On the beach you can go topless, without too much to worry about, though nude bathing is not cool.
Out at night you can wear pants, a dress, a skirt, or shorts, no worries. Indonesian women out late in the party scene often wear skimpy outfits, so you can enjoy the tropical climate, and not feel you have to cover up.
One place where you should cover up, is a Balinese temple. You’ll need a long sleeve, non-revealing shirt, sarong & sash (which you can often rent). You may not enter a Balinese temple during menstruation, as the Balinese consider you ‘sebel‘ (ritually unclean).
-Tampons, medicines and the Pill are available at local apoteks (pharmacies), but it’s more convenient to bring supplies from home. If you’re on the Pill, bring enough to last your entire trip (and remember that severe vomiting or diaorrhea can render it ineffective).
-Health care and pregnancy: Private healthcare in Bali is okay; if you find you’re pregnant during your trip, go to a nearby private doctor or hospital for advice. SOS International or BIMC are good clinics, both in the Kuta area. Most large hotel / resorts will have a doctor on call.
-Hospitals & Clinics in Bali.
Abortion is illegal in Indonesia, however, I know 2 people who have gone to a clinic in Bali, and had one, so ask around if you need one.
-Travelling in the rest of Indonesia:
The rest of Indonesia, with the exception of Jakarta, has way less foreigners. You will find yourself in the extreme minority, when traveling through Lombok, Java, Sumatra etc. While not generally dangerous, there are certain places that offer a higher degree of personal risk than others, including Papua, Aceh, Central Sulawesi. You should research your trip and talk to locals, for the latest news about your next destination.
The rest of Indonesia is either Muslim, Christian, or some variety of animist religion. When travelling in Muslim areas, its good for women to wear a non-revealing top, and long pants, definitely no sexy wear. Now, here’s the flip-side. In Jakarta you’ll find nightlclubs galore, that’s different. All across Indonesia there are whore houses galore, that still doesn’t mean its a good idea for you to wear sexy clothing. Locals will wonder why you are traveling in a foreign land without your ‘husband’, so you want to give them the impression you are just another traveler, so as not to draw attention. In general you will not have any major problems travelling as a female in Indonesia.